Pork Shoulder Bone In

Garlic and Sage Roasted Bone-In Pork Shoulder

December 14th, 2015 Posted by Main Dishes, Meat No Comment yet

We’ve been enjoying that pig over and over again. This time we tucked into one of the roasts! Funny thing is, Joel grabbed this out of the freezer and I totally thought it was a different roast…. a boneless Pork Loin roast. When I looked at the package again to check if it was thawed, I felt something funny… a bone!  After planning a completely different meal all morning, I realized the mistake and saw the label on the package. Good thing I noticed that this is a bone-in pork shoulder roast, or we would have been eating dinner at 9pm. This roast is far easier then the menu I was imagining, as long as you start it about 4 hours before you plan to eat it!

The benefit of cooking a piece of meat all day, is of course, the amazing smell while it’s cooking. Since I work from home I started it at around 1:30 and it was all ready by 6:30. It was a realllly great Tuesday at the office. 😉

Pork Shoulder Bone In

I made this with slow-roasted vegetables, mashed yukon golds, and a cherry-stout sauce. If you want to make things even easier, just throw the potatoes in with the vegetables and make a simple pan sauce (recipes below).

A simple bone in pork shoulder roast

A great fall weekend, or even mid-week meal… if you can swing it. The leftovers are great in sandwiches and tacos, too!

Roasted pork recipe adapted from Aaron McCargo, Jr. Cherry Stout sauce adapted from the America’s Test Kitchen Family Cookbook.

 

Garlic and Sage Roasted Bone-In Pork Shoulder
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: Serves 8
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons chopped garlic
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh sage
  • 1 3.5 – 4lb Pork Shoulder Roast, bone-in
  • for the Slow Roasted Vegetables:
  • 1-2 red beets, scrubbed
  • 2 carrots
  • 1 red onion
  • 5 cloves garlic, peels left on
  • 1 pound brussels sprouts
  • Cherry Stout Sauce:
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 shallot, chopped fine
  • Dash Allspice powder
  • 2 cups or 12 oz bottle Sierra Nevada Coffee Stout or other stout beer
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries
  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup chicken broth (low sodium or homemade)
  • 1 tablespoon non-GMO cornstarch
  • 3/4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. In a small bowl, mix together the olive oil, garlic, chopped fresh sage and salt and pepper. Using a spoon or a brush, spread the mixture all over the pork shoulder. Let the mixture sit on the pork at least 30 minutes or up to the night before. If prepping the night before, cover with plastic and refrigerate, allowing the pork to come to room temperature for 1-2 hours before roasting.
  3. Set the meat on a rack set into a roasting pan. Roast for 20 minutes, and then reduce the heat to 325 degrees.
  4. Continue to cook the roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the shoulder reads 185 degrees, about 3 hours 30 minutes, or 4 hours if your roast is closer to 4 pounds. When the roast has about 1 hour left, put your tray of vegetables on the lower rack. Roast along with the pork for the remaining time, letting the vegetables finish cooking while the roast rests and you make the sauce.
  5. When the roast is done, remove the pork from the oven and let stand until cool enough to handle, about 30 minutes.
  6. To make the cherry-stout sauce:
  7. Melt the butter in a small skillet over medium heat.
  8. Add the shallot and cook for about 2 minutes, until softened.
  9. Stir in the dash of allspice and cook for another 30 seconds.
  10. Pour in the stout slowly and stir. Add in the cherries and brown sugar and stir, simmering until lightly syrupy, about 10 minutes.
  11. Whisk the cornstarch and broth together, then gradually add it to the pan, stirring as you pour it in. Cook until thickened, about 2 more minutes.
  12. Turn off the heat and add the vinegar. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

 

 

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