Posts in Desserts

truffle cookies valentines day

Salted Chocolate Truffle Cookies (Gluten Free)

February 13th, 2017 Posted by Baked, Desserts, Holidays No Comment yet

I love Valentine’s Day! I know it’s over commercialized, but I love finding ways to make it personal to me and Joel, and the other people in my life that I love. I believe it’s always a good thing to celebrate love and to share love with others.

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Chocolate Chip Cookies – Egg-F ree

July 7th, 2016 Posted by Baked, Desserts, Egg-Free, Food No Comment yet

I found out about 3 years ago that I’m egg intolerant. I didn’t know there was such a thing, and it came as quite a shock to me. I love eggs… but they do not work well with my digestive system.

I’ve been slowly working on my favorite recipes to make them egg free! This chocolate chip cookie recipe has become an egg-free stand by.

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The best homemade hamburger buns! By Pickle Jar Studios

Giant Hamburger Buns

June 27th, 2016 Posted by Baked, Bread, Food, Grilling, Sandwiches No Comment yet

Summer is here! And that means grilling, among other things, like sandals, shorts (gasp! yes, this year I am actually embracing the shorts), lemonade, and lots and lots of sunscreen. I’m very pale.

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citrus peels

Candied Citrus Peel and Christmas Treat Boxes

December 18th, 2015 Posted by Christmas, Desserts, DIY, Food No Comment yet

Every year I make a mess of my kitchen. I actually have to purchase brown sugar, and I start stockpiling butter in the freezer beginning in October (hey, butter is expensive! Buy it on sale and store in your freezer.) I make a serious Christmas Treat Box, my friend, and my family loves it. I absolutely love making them.

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citrus compote

Vanilla Orange Compote

December 18th, 2015 Posted by Canning, Christmas, Desserts, DIY, Food 1 comment

This is a great one to make when you’ve got a bunch of orange fruit to use up after making Candied Citrus Peels.

It’s wonderful over yogurt, ice cream, pancakes, waffles, muffins or just eaten from the jar. You could even use it as a flavoring in a marinade or sauce for chicken; I think it would be delicious in a homemade teriyaki sauce!

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Rootbeer Float Ice Cream Cake

July 14th, 2015 Posted by Desserts, Frozen Treats No Comment yet

root beer float ice cream cake-3

This ice cream cake was from Father’s Day and I rescued just one slice to photograph for you. It was SO good. The real winner was the cake part! 

So this cake started with a hike in the woods. Joel and I went hiking and we were discussing what to make for Father’s Day. We were having our families over, and of course, our dads, for the Second Annual Father’s Day BBQ. I always like to make the dessert something that the dads really like. My dad always liked making root beer floats (and ice cream in general). So my simple idea was that we just make root beer floats (I’m making several other things… keep it simple, right?). As we’re hiking along, Joel says, “Why don’t you make a root beer float ice cream cake?” And I said. “Wut.” Yes. YES! (can you see why I love this man?)

So my only reservation was the fact that I didn’t really know how to make this dang thing. Joel says, “You’ve got one week to figure it out.” Ha. Thanks. 

I did some research, and we talked it out. Here’s what we came up with. Make a cake, add root beer flavoring to it. Then with the vanilla ice cream, swirl some more root beer into it. As I made each part of this cake, the method evolved.

You can make it with any vanilla cake recipe or even a boxed cake (you’ll need about 2 layers, so keep that in mind when choosing your recipe.) I tried Joy the Baker’s Yellow Cake recipe from her newest book, Homemade Decadence. It was amazing! It’s my new go-to. Totally versatile. Yes, Joy, I will be agreeing that we can just use this cake recipe from now on, thanks! So you can use that or make your favorite vanilla cake recipe. You want to start with a cake batter rather then pre-made cake because you’ll add some root beer syrup to the batter. The Joy recipe made 3 layers, but hey, the other layer went in the freezer and we made some cake and ice cream milkshakes. 

I wanted to make sure there was a good amount of root beer flavor, so I also added a brush of the syrup on to each cake layer as I made the cake and then root beer syrup and root beer into the icing, which I adapted from this recipe for stabilized whipped cream, which I now kinda love and want to make again. 

So here’s the thing you have to do. Start with two bottles of good quality root beer, such as Virgil’s or some similar type with real sugar. Simmer it and reduce it down to about 2/3 of a cup (alternatively, you could use root beer flavoring, at most grocery stores in the baking aisle by the extracts). Truthfully, I think an extract will give you the best flavor here, but the syrup is good too! 

  1. Make your cake. Add 1/3 of a cup of the syrup you made to the cake batter. Let the layers cool and wrap them individually in plastic wrap, then put them in the freezer, at least overnight (you can do this up to a month ahead of time). This will make it easier to cut and spread ice cream on too. 
  2. Make your root beer syrup, let it cool, and keep it in the fridge until you are ready to layer. You could do this 3 days ahead of time. 
  3. Assembly day: start somewhat early in the day assembling the ice cream cake. Let your vanilla ice cream melt for about 20 minutes. Line a metal (metal helps it freeze faster) bread loaf pan with parchment paper, then plastic wrap so that each side has a three inch over hang (this will help you un-mold it after it’s frozen) and start layering.
  4. To layer: Put a layer of cake down first, brush the syrup over it and then brush some straight, un-reduced root beer over that. Then put a layer of softened ice cream down and then put another drizzle of root beer syrup and a little more straight root beer. Freeze about 2 hours or until hardened enough to spread on the next layer. When the two hours are close to up, take the vanilla ice cream out of the freezer at least 20 minutes before you want to spread it so it can get melty again. Make the next layer: add the cake, syrup, root beer, ice cream, syrup, root beer and freeze another 2 hours, or preferably overnight.
  5. Make the stabilized whipped cream. Use the overhang of parchment to un-mold the frozen cake and place it on a platter lined with parchment that will fit back in the freezer. Cover the top and sides of the cake with a thin layer of the whipped cream frosting. This is just the base layer. Freeze the cake 15 minutes, then spread on the remaining whipped cream in a nice, thick layer. Drizzle more syrup and root beer over the top and let some of it drip down the side. Make swirl patterns with your frosting knife so that the syrup gets a little mixed into the whipped cream… but kinda resembles that root beer froth… get it??  Freeze until serving time. 

root beer float ice cream cake-2

 

There you have it! To simplify, you could use already baked pound cake, and just brush the syrup over it… but I’ll leave that up to you.

All I know is, the dad’s loved it. 

Rootbeer Float Ice Cream Cake
 
Recipe Type: Ice cream cake, Dessert
Serves: 8 servings
Ingredients
  • Cake:
  • Your favorite vanilla cake mix, or Joy the Bakers Yellow cake
  • 2 bottles good quality root beer
  • 1 carton Tillamook Vanilla Bean ice cream
  • 1 ½ cups cold heavy whipping cream
  • 1 ½ teaspoons unflavored gelatin
  • 1 ½ tablespoons cold water
  • 5 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. Make the syrup: simmer two cups of the rootbeer and reduce it down to about 2/3 of a cup (alternatively, you could use roughly 2 tablespoons root beer flavoring in the cake, available at most grocery stores in the baking aisle by the extracts). You want to save the extra syrup and any extra root beer (you can allow it to go flat) for brushing on the layers, and adding to the frosting.
  2. Make your cake. Add 1/3 of a cup of the syrup (or 2-3 tablespoons extract) you made to the cake batter. Let the layers cool and wrap them individually in plastic wrap, then put them in the freezer, at least overnight (you can do this up to a month ahead of time).
  3. Assembly day: Let your vanilla ice cream melt for about 20 minutes. Line a metal (metal helps it freeze faster) bread loaf pan with parchment paper, then plastic wrap so that each side has a three inch over hang (this will help you un-mold it after it’s frozen) and start layering.
  4. To layer: Put a layer of cake down first. Be sure to fill the bottom of the pan. I set the pan on top of the cake and then used it as a template to see where I needed to cut, then placed the cake snuggly in the bottom of the pan.
  5. Brush the syrup over your first cake layer and then brush some straight, un-reduced root beer over that. Then put a layer of softened ice cream down and then put another drizzle of root beer syrup and a little more straight root beer.
  6. Freeze about 2 hours or until hardened enough to spread on the next layer. When the two hours are close to up, take the vanilla ice cream out of the freezer at least 20 minutes before you want to spread it so it can get melty again.
  7. Make the next layer: add the cake, syrup, root beer, ice cream, syrup, root beer and freeze another 2 hours, or preferably overnight.
  8. Make the stabilized whipped cream. Sprinkle gelatin over cold water in a small, microwave-safe bowl and let sit 1 minute or until absorbed. Microwave gelatin on high 20 seconds; it should finish clear. With mixer, using the chilled whisk, beat the cream until peaks just start to form. Gradually add sugar. While mixer is running, slowly pour in gelatin mixture. Add vanilla, 2-3 tablespoons of reserved root beer syrup, and finish beating when stiff peaks form. Use the overhang of parchment to un-mold the frozen cake and place it on a platter lined with parchment that will fit back in the freezer. Cover the top and sides of the cake with a thin layer of the whipped cream frosting. This is just the base layer.
  9. Freeze the cake 15 minutes, then spread on the remaining whipped cream in a nice, thick layer. Drizzle more syrup and root beer over the top and let some of it drip down the side. Make swirl patterns with your frosting knife so that the syrup gets a little mixed into the whipped cream (optional). Freeze until serving time.
 

 

 

 

Bourbon Butterscotch Pudding

May 10th, 2015 Posted by Desserts, DIY, Sweet Sundays No Comment yet

butterscotch bourbon pudding
I am intimidated by things. By a lot of things. Namely, girls that are beautiful and well-spoken and seem to have it all together when I soooooo do not, guys who know their wines, and probably most kids over the age of 6. Also, things that are eggy-custard based [please note the “eggy-custard based” is now a technical term, and I might refer to it elsewhere.]

This includes but is not limited to: puddings, ice creams, and pastry creams. I have a fear of… curdling. Or clumping? Either way, I don’t want little lumps of egg in my custardy-eggy product [again, technical term.] 

So, how do we combat this? Head on! Let’s make pudding! I wanted to make this pudding because I actually have an odd love for pudding and also butterscotch–ever since I would get those little yellow cellophane wrapped candies as a kid from my parents church friends.

The church my parents went to for a time when I was 0-8 had a campground and a whole cafeteria and kitchen areas (no, it wasn’t a cult. At least I don’t think it was.) I used to count the minutes until we could go have lunch in that cafeteria. It was the usual kind; go down the line and pick up what you want, leave what you don’t. As a kid, on my tray were three puddings and a dinner roll with butter. What can I say? Not much has changed, except now I might add some sautéed spinach.

I guess there is something about eating butterscotch pudding that reminds me of those days. Unafraid of what others thought, gleeful that the sermon was over, and happy to have freedom from the hard wooden chair. Come to think of it, I feel that pudding and childhood are inexplicably linked. 

butterscotch bourbon pudding

So to get back to my fears, this pudding was far easier then I expected it to be. It just whisks together, non-fussily [theirs another technical term for you] and so quickly. Then you let it cool to room temp and refrigerate. There are no clumps, because the cornstarch is well whisked into the butter and sugar, and it all thickens up quicker then expected, so you don’t need to stand at the stove stirring for minutes that feel like eternity.

You start with the butter which is browned a bit. 

butterscotch bourbon pudding

Another thing: I like to have all my ingredients measured out when working with things that require eggs and cooking milk. Things can go more quickly then you realize and it prevents accidentally burning something. 

Using a pot that has a lighter color–white or cream–inside makes it far easier to tell if the butter is browned. I would not recommend using dark non-stick pans for pudding.

After the butter is browned, whisk in dark brown sugar (homemade if you’ve got it), cornstarch, milk, salt and egg yolks. 

butterscotch bourbon pudding

Whisk together and add the rest of the milk, then return it to the heat to continue cooking until it thickens. This pudding thickened up faster then I thought! A lot faster than ice cream, which was nice… I’m all for speedy sweets! 

When the pudding is thickened, it will give off bubbles that quickly burst at the surface, which is a little scary, but then you know it’s done. 

butterscotch bourbon pudding
Remove it from the heat and stir in a little more butter, the bourbon, and vanilla. 

butterscotch bourbon pudding

Cover with plastic wrap directly touching the surface of the pudding, and let it come to room temperature on the counter. When it has cooled, transfer to the fridge and chill for at least 2 hours or overnight. 

butterscotch bourbon puddingReady for the fridge: 

butterscotch bourbon pudding

Dish up with some whipped cream if you want, and run around, remembering with delight that you are not confined to a wooden chair. It all seems a bit less intimidating now.  

butterscotch bourbon pudding

Adapted from The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook: 100 Delicious Heritage Recipes from the Farm and Garden

Bourbon Butterscotch Pudding
 
Author: Sugar Pickles
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 3 cups
Ingredients
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
  • 3/4 cup packed dark brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons cornstarch
  • 2 cups milk, divided
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon bourbon (or Scotch)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla, optional
  • whipped cream for serving, optional
Instructions
  1. In a medium saucepan over medium heat, melt two tablespoons of the butter until browned, about 2 minutes.
  2. Remove from the heat and add the brown sugar, cornstarch, 1/2 a cup of the milk, salt, and egg yolks.
  3. Whisk in the remaining 1 1/2 cups milk and return to medium heat. Cook, stirring constantly, until the pudding thickens. It will probably get thick in about 3-5 minutes at medium heat, but every stove is different.
  4. When it is giving off bubbles that suddenly burst, and is thick like honey, you can remove it from the heat. Whisk in the remaining tablespoon of butter, the alcohol of choice, and the vanilla if using.
  5. Transfer to a bowl and cover with plastic wrap, with the wrap directly touching the surface of the pudding. Let it cool to room temperature, then refrigerate until ready to serve, at least 2 hours.
  6. I love this served with freshly whipped cream.
 

Resources: 

Pudding bowls, vintage, a few can be found here

Clear mixing bowl, Luminarc, Amazon

My favorite plastic wraps (which may be silly to post here, but I think they are worth their weight in gold): Glad Cling Wrap or Stretch-tite 

Brown sugar, homemade, recipe here

For this recipe I used our “everyday” bourbon of choice: Maker’s Mark. 

Easy Chocolate Fudge Sauce

April 19th, 2015 Posted by Desserts, Sweet Sundays No Comment yet

chocolate fudge sauce-7

You know that moment when something easy, delicious and quick comes together in the SAME recipe? This is that moment! This chocolate fudge sauce comes from Joel’s brother, Jesse. He made it at a family dinner once, in about 10 seconds, in the microwave! I was stunned at how easy and good it is. 

This fudge sauce can be thrown together while you’re dishing up the ice cream. You can switch it up by using either almond extract or vanilla extract. You could even use a little orange liqueur. 

 In a small sauce pan (if heating on the stove) or in a small microwave-safe dish, combine the ingredients. Butter, cocoa powder, heavy cream, sugar, instant espresso powder, and a pinch of kosher or sea salt. 

chocolate fudge sauce

Heat on low for a a few minutes, whisking, until the mixture is smooth and slightly thick. If you want to use the microwave, heat at normal power, in 30 second intervals, stirring until mixed. 

Remove from the heat or take out of the microwave, and stir in the extract or liqueur if using. Serve it right out of the pan, or transfer to a small pitcher or bowl.

chocolate fudge sauce quick and easy

It’s awesome over ice cream, cake, brownies….

chocolate fudge sauce

Now I just need a bigger bowl. 

chocolate fudge sauce-11

 

chocolate fudge sauce recipe

Easy Chocolate Fudge Sauce
 
Recipe Type: Dessert, Sweet Sunday
Author: Sugar Pickles
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 2 cups
Ingredients
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup cocoa
  • 4 tb butter
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 3/4 tsp coffee or espresso (instant granules)
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 tsp vanilla
Instructions
  1. Heat sugar, cocoa, butter, heavy cream, coffee and salt over low heat or in the microwave for 1 minute until mixed. Stir and heat until well blended.
  2. Take off the heat and add the vanilla. The sauce will thicken as it cools. Will keep in the fridge up to a week.
 

 

Mini Strawberry Galettes

April 12th, 2015 Posted by Baked, Desserts 2 comments

mini strawberry galettes

Now. Now’s about the time when I want to eat all the things that aren’t ready yet. The tomatoes, the melons, the strawberries! I have bought tomatoes more times then I should have this spring, hoping they would be ripe and luscious, only to be greeted with mealy and lack luster flesh. Their red shiny skins trick me, and I’m always disappointed when I cut into them at home. Joel tells me to have patience. One perfectly ripe tomato is better then a million out of season tomatoes. 

Strawberries in Oregon fall into the same category. Red, fragrant even, and yet when they are revealed for who they really are under the edge of my knife, they are white straight to the core.

A trick for all the premature fruit? Roasting! Roasting brings out the sweetness of both these little sirens, coaxing something hard and bland into soft and sweet with concentrated flavors.

Because these little tarts are baked, the strawberries are better then if I had served them fresh!

The pastry I use here is what makes these so easy and fantastic. This is a pre-made puff pastry from Grand Central Bakery. I was so excited when I saw it at one of their locations in Portland. It’s in the ready made cases in all their locations (they have other fabulous pastry items too) and it’s made with all butter. It’s far better tasting and quality then what you get in that grocery store puff pastry, and it has all real ingredients! It’s my new secret weapon, and I’m not paid to say that. 

If you don’t have a Grand Central Bakery by you, check with your local bakeries. They might have something delicious too! You could also be super ambitious and make your own puff pastry.

the best pre-made puff pastrythe best pre-made puff pastryMaking these tarts just requires cutting up the berries, mixing them with some butter and sugar, and assembling the tarts. They bake up buttery and flaky and smell so maddeningly delicious while they are baking. 

To distract myself, I flipped through the cookbook I’m currently obsessed with, and from which this recipe was adapted: 
Huckleberry cookbook

I have the whole thing bookmarked. It’s a gorgeous book and really fun to read. Check it out: Huckleberry: Stories, Secrets and Recipes From Our Kitchen. You might like to know that this one was totally on my list!

When the tarts come out of the oven, you can let them cool and top with powdered sugar:

mini strawberry galettes

mini strawberry galettes-5
These are so flakey and buttery… 

mini strawberry galettes

 

Mini Strawberry Galettes
 
Recipe Type: Dessert
Author: Sugar Pickles
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 8-10
Ingredients
  • 1 package Grand Central U-Bake Classic Puff Pastry or 1 pound, 12 oz package other brand prepared puff pastry
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 pint strawberries, hulled and cut into 1/2 inch slices
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon granulated sugar, plus more for sprinkling
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon water or milk
  • Powdered sugar for dusting, real whipped cream, or vanilla ice cream (optional)
Instructions
  1. Defrost puff pastry overnight in the refrigerator or on the counter for about 3 hours. The dough should be chilled but pliable.
  2. In a small bowl, crack the egg and add in the water or milk. Lightly whisk and set aside. This is your egg wash for later.
  3. Melt the butter and toss in a medium bowl with the strawberries. Set aside.
  4. Unroll the thawed pastry and cut in half. On a lightly floured surface, roll out so that you have one side that is at least 14 inches. I like to roll it about 10-12 times, until it gets a couple inches bigger then it is out of the package. Cutting the sheet of pastry in half makes for easier rolling, but requires repeating the rolling and cutting steps. Do whatever works for you and your work surface.
  5. Cut the pastry into squares that are about 4 inches x 4 inches. Transfer each square to a parchment lined baking sheet, evenly spacing them on the sheet. Save any strips or scraps of puff pastry (see below for ideas).
  6. Toss the brown sugar, granulated sugar and salt in with the strawberry mixture. Evenly pile the strawberry mixture into the center of each puff pastry square, leaving a 1-inch border all around. Lightly brush, using a pastry brush or two fingers, the borders with the egg wash. Fold the pastry border over like a picture frame, and gently press down on the corners to seal. Freeze for at least 20 minutes or up to 1 month, tightly wrapped.
  7. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. When ready to bake, brush the crusts with the egg wash and sprinkle with more granulated sugar. Bake from frozen until deep golden brown, 30-35 minutes. Transfer to a cooling rack to keep crisp.
  8. To serve, put in a low-sided bowl with whipped cream, ice cream or simply dust with powdered sugar.
  9. Save those puff pastry scraps!
  10. Joel made a wonderful and quick appetizer by brushing this garlic butter on the dough, and sprinkling grated mild cheddar cheese on top.
  11. Bake at 400 for 10-12 minutes or until golden brown and puffed. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese when it comes out and add freshly ground black pepper.
  12. Another great way to use up puff pastry scraps is to make single crusted mini pot pies. Just fill small ramekins with chicken, turkey or beef filling, drape the pastry on top, arranging in an overlapping pattern and brush with egg wash.
  13. If you don’t want use the scraps up when you make the tarts, you can re-wrap them and re-freeze them for another day.
 

Resources:

Pitcher, from Home Goods by Dutch Wax, part of the Floral French pattern

Puff pastry, Grand Central Bakery

 

Classic Banana Bread

March 22nd, 2015 Posted by Baked, Snacks, Sweet Sundays No Comment yet

moms classic banana bread

Oh this bread. It’s like a friend.

Smells from my childhood, with this bread. Smells like home, like after school snacks, like Sunday afternoons with a cup of tea. It’s a classic, and suuuuper easy to pull off. 

This bread freezes well, smells richly of bananas, ships well and is so full of banana flavor, you will eat half of it before you can even stop yourself. Make two, mail one, and you’ll be the lady with the BEST banana bread!

Mom gave me this recipe and the one small trick that goes along with it. It uses three times the amount of ripe bananas then the recipe originally called for. This one also has chopped walnuts. You could add chocolate chips, coconut, cashews– anything you like! I experiment with recipes so much, I wanted to make this recipe straight up, just like mom made. 

Okay, so here’s the thing about me and bananas. Sometimes they get too ripe before I can eat them all. No biggie, I throw them in the freezer (peel on) and just let them hang out there until I want to make some kind of banana bread/cake/smoothie (not all at once) thing with them. They don’t come out looking like the most attractive things, but they taste AMAZING. For this bread, we use three over ripe bananas, thawed from my freezer. 

The rest is simple: flour, sugar, butter, eggs, salt, baking soda and baking powder. Mash those ‘nanners with a fork! 

moms classic banana bread-1

Cream the butter and sugar. Mom always used a hand mixer. I have one, but I usually use my stand mixer. I thought for this recipe, what the heck? I’ll use the hand mixer. Butter and sugar ehhhvrewheree. Hmmmm. This is how my mom made cookies all those times? My heart goes out to ya, babe. 

hand mixer

We persevere  on, and add the eggs. Now things mix a little easier!

mixing in eggs

Then we add the flour in three additions, alternating twice with the banana mash.  

After first flour addition and with the first batch of bananas.

moms classic banana bread-6

Second addition of flour mixed, and add second batch of bananas. 

moms classic banana bread-8

Third addition of flour and the last. 

moms classic banana bread-9

Stir in walnuts. 

stir in the walnuts

Pour in to a buttered and parchment lined loaf pan, and bake until golden brown, about 45-50 minutes. 

buttered and parchment line your pan

It really makes a great breakfast or anytime snack with a little bit of butter. It’s so moist, you really can just eat it plain too!

moms classic banana bread-22

moms classic banana bread-14

Classic Banana Bread
 
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 1 loaf
Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup butter, room temperature
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 3/4 cups sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 ripe bananas, thawed from the freezer if frozen
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350. Butter a 9x5x3 loaf pan well and line with parchment. Butter the parchment for extra insurance.
  2. In the bowl of a stand mixer or with a hand mixer, cream together the shortening and sugar. Add the eggs and beat well. In a separate bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients. Mash together the three ripe bananas. Add the dry ingredients to the creamed mixture, alternating in 3 additions with the mashed banana, blending well after each addition, ending with the flour. Stir in the nuts.
  3. Pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 45-50 minutes or until the top is golden brown and a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Remove from the pan to cool on a rack. Serve when cooled, at least 40 minutes, or wrap in plastic to store in the fridge for up to a week.
 

 

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